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3D Mammography

3D Mammography 

At Lincoln Medical Center, we’re proud to now offer the Genius™ 3D Mammography™ exam that provides better, earlier breast cancer detection for our patients.

How a 3D Mammogram Works

Women will see little difference between a conventional 2D mammogram and a 3D mammogram™. The exam has a shorter compression time – a 3.7 second scan time – and the positioning is the same. The real difference is in the information available to the doctor.

The new mammogram unit performs Digital Breast Tomosynthesis screenings or “tomo” which captures images of the breast from multiple angles allowing the radiologist to see the breast tissue in several thin layers, rather than one flat 2D image.

A good analogy for 3D Mammography™ is like thinking of the pages in a book. If you look down at the cover you cannot see all of the pages – but when you open it up, you can go through the entire book page-by-page to see everything between the covers.

3D Mammography and Breast Density

How to Schedule

Women should should begin receiving screening mammograms annually at age 40.  If you have a family history of breast cancer, you may be directed to begin screening earlier.

For more information or to schedule an appointment for a 3D mammogram, you can speak to your primary health care provider or self-schedule your mammogram by calling 931-438-1100.

Sources:

  1. FDA submissions P080003, P080003/S001, P080003/S004, P080003/S005.
  2. Friedewald SM, Rafferty EA, Rose SL, et al. Breast cancer screening using tomosynthesis in combination with digital mammography. JAMA. 2014 Jun 25;311(24):2499-507.
  3. Zuckerman SP, Conant EF, Keller BM, et al. Implementation of Synthesized Two-dimensional Mammography in a Population-based Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Program. Radiology. 2016 Dec;281(3):730-736.
  4. Skaane P, Bandos A, Eben EB, et al. Two-view digital breast tomosynthesis screening with synthetically reconstructed projection images: comparison with digital breast tomosynthesis with full-field digital mammographic images. Radiology. 2014 Jun;271(3):655-63.
  5. Bernardi D, Macaskill P, Pellegrini M, et. al. Breast cancer screening with tomosynthesis (3D mammography) with acquired or synthetic 2D mammography compared with 2D mammography alone (STORM-2): a population-based prospective study. Lancet Oncol. 2016 Aug;17(8):1105-13.
  6. McDonald ES, Oustimov A, Weinstein SP, et al. Effectiveness of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Compared With Digital Mammography: Outcomes Analysis From 3 Years of Breast Cancer Screening. JAMA Oncol. 2016 Jun 1;2(6):737-43.
  7. Results from Friedewald, SM, et al. “Breast cancer screening using tomosynthesis in combination with digital mammography.” JAMA 311.24 (2014): 2499-2507; a multi-site (13), non-randomized, historical control study of 454,000 screening mammograms investigating the initial impact the introduction of the Hologic Selenia® Dimensions® on screening outcomes. Individual results may vary. The study found an average 41% (95% CI: 20-65%) increase and that 1.2 (95% CI: 0.8-1.6) additional invasive breast cancers per 1000 screening exams were found in women receiving combined 2D FFDM and 3D™ mammograms acquired with the Hologic 3D Mammography™ System versus women receiving 2D FFDM mammograms only.
  8. Ho JM, Jafferjee N, Covarrubias GM, Ghesani M, Handler B. Dense breasts: a review of reporting legislation and available supplemental screening options. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 203(2):449-56, 2014.
  9. Sprague BL, Gangnon RE, Burt V, et al. Prevalence of mammographically dense breasts in the United States. J Natl Cancer Inst. 106(10), 2014.
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